LASA Tri-State Conference 2019 – A new dawn – reframing aged care service delivery through models of care

Published on 26 February 2019

As the demand for differentiated aged care services continues to grow, providers across Australia increasingly have to compete to engage with their consumers. Aged care service expectations are becoming more complex than ever before. Consumers are calling for transformation of traditional models of care to models that deliver quality and best practise whilst facilitating personal lifestyle preferences and enabling decision-making and choice.

As this new era dawns upon our sector, providers must rise to the challenge and transform the way aged care services are delivered to improve our client outcomes.

A fundamental principle of  Model of Care is the emphasis on respecting individual differences and promoting individual choices and decision-making, in all aspects of the care and services provided to the resident. It views the resident as a whole person who is part of an extended social network and includes the existing and future friend and family relationships which must be consciously respected and observed as they form part of the social fabric of their life in residential care.

A successful model recognises that the activities which provide meaning for an individual are far broader than recreation and should be considered in the context of a “whole of life” approach.

Finding meaning and purpose which upholds the resident’s sense of self, dignity and ability in day to day activities is essential.

So, how do our sector’s providers develop, adopt and implement a successful model of care?

Encompassing an Australian case study example, Judi Coombe’s presentation at this year’s Tri-State conference takes listeners through the process that could transform their aged care service delivery.

From the developmental phase where we review international care models and conduct workshops to assess off the shelf models and best practise strategies, to the importance of sequential introduction of the elements with focus on rate of implementation and multifaceted training.

Consdering effecting culture change across more than one facility in order to establish a resident centric care model throughout an organisation and highlights key model of care influencers such as built environment and staffing models.

Broaden your mindset and consider ways your organisation can transform practises to meet our future consumers.

You can view Judi’s presentation below